José Muñoz, Director of the Coalition for Community Schools at the Institute for Educational Leadership, to Assume Role as President of the Education Commission of the States

lazy image

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Washington, D.C., January 4, 2024 – The Institute for Educational Leadership (IEL) congratulates José Muñoz, IEL’s Senior Director of the Coalition for Community Schools, on his new role as the President of the Education Commission of the States (ECS). This serves as a testament to his exceptional leadership and impact he has made within the education sector.

“Throughout my tenure at IEL, José has been an invaluable teammate and source of positivity,” said Eddie Koen, IEL President. “Before I arrived at IEL, José kept the organization running as interim president, stepping up to the plate during a time of transition. Since then, his continued leadership as Coalition Director has led to great strides for the Community Schools movement and IEL alike. I look forward to partnering with José in new ways as he helms the team at ECS, and know that he will continue to advance the transformation of public education.”

Over the last six years, José has exhibited unwavering dedication to the mission of the Coalition for Community Schools and the Institute for Educational Leadership. His leadership of the Coalition for Community Schools has been marked by significant accomplishments, including unprecedented growth of the Coalition’s nine networks and introduction of a co-chairs model that has fostered network-led leadership and collaboration, enhancing the effectiveness of the Coalition’s initiatives. 

José’s strategic vision has expanded the Coalition’s place-based work through a regional model. This thoughtful approach has strengthened the organization’s ability to address the unique needs of communities across the country.

“My journey at IEL has been a fantastic one, and the relationships and infrastructure our team has built over the years will continue to serve IEL, the Coalition, and its networks well in implementing and expanding quality Community Schools in communities across the country,” said José. “I’m excited to build on the policy and advocacy work we have done here at IEL and carry that momentum into my role at ECS. IEL will continue to be a great partner in preparing leaders interested in education policy!”

True to IEL’s values, José’s collaborative approach has also led to a combined annual National Community Schools and Family and Community Engagement conference, attracting hundreds of cross-sector partners and thousands of participants.

“We are so grateful for José’s guidance of the Community School field during his time with IEL,” shared Stacy Holland, President of IEL’s Board of Directors. “I’m confident that his impact will continue to be felt in the field as our organizations work together to improve educational outcomes for children.” 

As José assumes his new role as President of the Education Commission of the States, we express our deep appreciation for his outstanding contributions and wish him continued success in his endeavors. 

We will be launching a national search for a new Director, and in the interim Kwesi Rollins, IEL’s Senior Vice President for Leadership and Engagement will be leading the Coalition, supported by our Regional Deputy Directors.

The Regional Deputy Directors will continue to lead movement building efforts by providing a multi-tiered system of partnership that connects and convenes education leaders from across the nation through regional networking, provides consulting for place-based strategic planning efforts, and coaches local and statewide leaders on developing collaborative leadership systems focused on results.

For media inquiries, please contact:

Mia Calys – calysm@iel.org

Communications Manager

Institute for Educational Leadership

 

Biden-Harris Administration Announces Nearly $74 Million to Expand Full-Service Community Schools

3 months ago by

Community School Approach Reaches High Of 60%, Reports Latest Pulse Panel

3 months ago by

Community schools were working in Oakland, but the district is shutting them down anyway

2 years ago by