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Stage 6: Milestone 4

Stage 1 | Stage 2 | Stage 3 | Stage 4 | Stage 5 | Stage 6

MILESTONES:

COLLECT DATA TO ASSESS PROGRESS USE DATA TO STRENGTHEN THE INITIATIVE PUBLICIZE PROGRESS EXPAND ROLLOUT PREPARATION AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM SCAN
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STAGE 6: CONTINUE IMPROVEMENT AND EXPANSION
Milestone #4: Expand Roll-out

Some things to think about:

Keep at it. Make sure the challenges—and satisfactions—of implementing the first round of school sites keep you pushing forward. Use the rollout schedule and timeframe developed in Stage 3 to stay on target. However, take time to look at data across sites to identify any factors that might affect site selection. Be alert to the need for additional or different types of professional development, technical assistance, and/or policy support that could enhance rollout and implementation at future sites.

Most important, bear in mind that, if the scale-up initiative is to succeed, new stakeholders and new school sites will need to develop a sense of shared ownership, a deep commitment to community schools principles, and a willingness to expand their capacity with respect to financial matters and community engagement.

None of this work can be rushed. There is good reason to believe, however, that subsequent sites in your community will develop faster because of the foundational work you have already completed. The principles of community schools are already embedded in the structure and culture of a scaled-up system. The results are impressive and critical to our shared future: Successful children, families, schools, and communities.
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CONTINUED GROWTH

Rollout strategies emerge in a variety of ways. In Multnomah County, Oregon, the SUN Community Schools secured a commitment of reallocated county dollars to create 23 additional community schools in 2004. Over time, a variety of grants, district contributions, and a new allocation from the Portland Children’s Levy permitted SUN to grow to more than 60 schools.

Cincinnati’s school board has set forth a vision for all schools to become community learning centers. The Community Learning Centers Institute, which serves as the local intermediary, and community partners are gradually moving in that direction and plan to place a full-time resource coordinator in every school; they are already 40 percent there, with coordinators in 22 schools. At the same time, through community partnerships, they have placed mental health counselors in schools, established school-based health centers, and added a variety of supports and opportunities for students. Still, the overall goal is for schools to function as community learning centers.

In Evansville, Indiana, the school district has embedded family and community engagement in its strategic plan and expects all schools to be community schools. Evansville has made a strong commitment to integrating federal funding streams with the work of community partners, preparing principals to function as leaders, and developing an evaluation strategy that captures data on indicators for success.

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Guide Home - IntroductionPart I - Part II - Part III - Part IV - Appendix - Tools

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