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Stage 3: Milestone 1

Stage 1 | Stage 2 | Stage 3 | Stage 4 | Stage 5 | Stage 6

MILESTONES:

DEVELOP A ROLLOUT STRATEGY PREPARE FOR EVALUATION CREATE A RESULTS-BASED LOGIC MODEL DEFINE DESIRED RESULTS
 
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STAGE 3: PLAN FOR SCALE UP
Milestone #1: Define Desired Results


Some things to think about:

In Stage 1, stakeholders negotiated a broad vision for a scaled-up system of community schools. Now, they need to specify long-term results that address children and families, schools, and communities as well as the indicators used to measure progress toward results. In general terms, system results include the familiar characteristics of shared ownership, spread, depth, and sustainability, although partners must craft highly specific, measurable results. The Coalition’s Results Framework (Figure 7) spells out seven broad results linked to the conditions for learning. Many communities develop similar lists that include the following:

  • Children are ready to enter school.
  • Children succeed academically.
  • Students are actively involved in learning and in the community.
  • Students are physically, socially, and emotionally healthy.
  • Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments.
  • Families are actively involved in children’s education.
  • Communities are desirable places to live.

Given the long-term nature of the results, it is essential to develop indicators to measure progress toward each result. Some results related to, for example, immunization rates, test scores, or school attendance rates are probably available through schools or community partner agencies. Other results, such as service delivery or parent attendance at adult education classes, are linked to other types of data collection. Initiatives may want to begin to structure interagency agreements needed for data sharing.

The challenge in specifying results is to be comprehensive without requiring the collection of an unwieldy mass of data. The overarching consideration is to determine which specific results bring schools and community partners together around a shared vision. For example, attendance and chronic absence affect the school, family, health, and student engagement dimensions.
 
Figure 7. Results Framework



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USING RESULTS TO DRIVE PROGRAMMING

The Greater Lehigh Valley United Way COMPASS Community Schools initiative uses Results-Based Accountability planning to drive its work. The approach to planning starts with the end in mind. What results does COMPASS want for children and youth? What indicators require measurement? Planners map backwards to develop programs and services to achieve results. Lehigh Valley finds the approach particularly useful because it leads people to think about who is responsible for a particular indicator and what organizations need to join forces to "turn the curve" in a positive direction on a particular measure. The Results Leadership Group provided training to selected COMPASS staff in planning systems. COMPASS Director Jill Pereira is a strong believer in results-based accountability and planning.

 

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Guide Home - IntroductionPart I - Part II - Part III - Part IV - Appendix - Tools

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