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Data Collection Tools Guide

The table below outlines the resutl area, indicators, target group, questions, citation for each data collection instrument referenced in the Community Schools Evaluation Toolkit.


Survey # Result Indicator Respondent Questions Grade Full citation
 1 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Student 1-6 3-8 Harter, S. (1985), Social Suppport Scale for Children. University of Denver, University Park, Denver, CO 80208
 2 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel competent Student 1-6 3-8 Harter, S. (1985). Self Perception Profile for Children: University of Denver, University Park, Denver, CO 80208.
 3 Students are healthy Positive peer relationship Student 1-22 3-8 Wheeler, V. A., & Ladd, G. W. (1982). Assessment of children’s self-efficacy for social interactions with peers. Developmental Psychology, 18(6), 795-805.
 4 Students are healthy Positive peer relationship Student 1-6 3-8 Harter, S. (1985). Social Support Scale for Children: University of Denver, University Park, Denver, CO 80208.
 5 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Post-secondary plans Student 1-6, 10-13 4-8 New Orleans Kids Partnership, & America's Promise. An End-of-Year Survey for Students in Grades 4–8. Unpublished Survey. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology.
 6 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel competent  Student 1-4 (twice) 5-12 Marsh, H. W. (1990). The structure of academic self-concept: The Marsh/Shavelson model. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82, 623-636.
 7 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student 1-18 6-12 Goodenow, C. (1993). The psychological sense of school membership among adolescents: Scale development and educational correlates. Psychology in the Schools, 30, 79-91.
 8 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel competent Student 1-5 6-12 McCoach, D. B. (2002) A validation study of the school assessment survey. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 35,McCoach, D. B. (2002). A validation study of the school assessment survey. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 35, 66-71..
 9 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student 1-4 7-12 Canty-Mitchell, J., & Zimet, G. D. (2000). Psychometric properties of the multidimensional scale of perceived social support in urban adolescents. American Journal of Community Psychology in the Schools, 28(3), 391- 403.
 10 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student 1-9 7-12 Phillips, J., & Springer, F. (1992). Extended National Youth Sports Program 1991–92 evaluation highlights, Part two: Individual Protective Factors Index (IPFI) and risk assessment study. Unpublished report prepared for the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Sacramento, CA: EMT Associates. from http://emt.org/userfiles/ipfi.pdf
 11 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family attendance at school-wide events and parent-teacher conferences Student 1-9 7-12 Voydanoff, P., & Donnelly, B. W. (1999). Risk and protective factors for psychological adjustment and grades among adolescents. Journal of Family Issues, 20(3), 328-349.
 12 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel empowered Student 1-6 8-12 Oman, R. F., Vesely, S. K., McLeroy, K. R., Harris-Wyatt, V., Aspy, C. B., Rodine, S., et al. (2002). Reliability and validity of the youth asset survey. Journal of Adolescent Health, 31, 247-255.
 13 Students are healthy Positive peer relationship Student 1-8 8-12 Muris, P. (2001). A brief questionnaire for measuring self-efficacy in youth (s). Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 23, 145-149.
 14 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Incidents of bullying, violence, weapons Student 21-26 California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007-2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007) (pp. 1-12): California Department of Education.
 14 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Student 56-61 California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007-2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007) (pp. 1-12): California Department of Education.
 14 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student 14-18 elem California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 14 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Staff, families, and students feel safe Student 28-29 elem California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 14 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student 9-11 elem California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education. 
 14 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Student 12-15, 17-18 elem California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Elementary School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008 (Version E10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 15 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Student 20-21 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student 7, 23-24 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Staff, families, and students feel safe Student 1-2 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student 28 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students succeed academically Teacher classroom management Student 11 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Student 4-10, 15-16 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 15 Students succeed academically Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching Student 4-5, 8, 10, 12-16, 18 elem Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Elementary School Student Edition (pp. 8): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 16 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Post-secondary plans Student 1-8 Elementary Nichols, A., & Mitchell, M. J. (2007 - 2008). Career Exploration Survey (in Cincy After School Program Evaluation Training 2007-2008 Training). Unpublished Survey
 17 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Incidents of bullying, violence, weapons Student A81-A93, A94-A100, A102-A103 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module A: Core (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Deapartment of Education.
 17 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Opportunities for student leadership Student A29-A31 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module A: Core (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Deapartment of Education.
 17 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student A14-A19, A23-A28 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module A: Core (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Deapartment of Education.
 17 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel empowered Student A20-A22 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module A: Core (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Deapartment of Education.
 18 Students are healthy Asthma control Student E10, E27-E32 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 18 Students are healthy Nutritional habits Student E4-E9, E13-E17, E26 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 18 Students are healthy Opportunities for physical activity during school Student E19, E22-E23 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 18 Students are healthy Physical fitness Student E1-E3, E11-E12 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 19 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Schools are open to community Student H2-H5 middle school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: Middle School Questionnaire, Module H: District After-School Module (Version M10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 20 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel empowered Student A21-A23 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008, Module A: Core (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 20 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student A10-A13 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008, Module A: Core (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 20 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Student A13, A15, A17, A19, A21-A23 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008, Module A: Core (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 20 Students succeed academically Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching  Student A16, A18, A20 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire 2007 - 2008, Module A: Core (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 21 Students are healthy Positive adult relationships Student B25-B30 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module B: Supplemental Resilience and Youth Development (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 21 Students are healthy Positive peer relationship Student B13, B19-B24 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module B: Supplemental Resilience and Youth Development (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 22 Students are healthy Asthma control Student E10, E28-33 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 22 Students are healthy Physical fitness Student E1-E3, E11-E12 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 23 Students are healthy Nutritional habits Student E4-E9, E13-E17, E26 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 23 Students are healthy Opportunities for physical activity during school Student E19, E22-E23 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module E: Physical Health (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 24 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Schools are open to community Student H2-H5 high school California Department of Education. (2007). California Healthy Kids Survey: High School Questionnaire, Module H: District After-School Module (Version H10 - Fall 2007): California Department of Education.
 25 Students succeed academically Teacher classroom management Student 22-25 high school Metropolitan Federation of Alternative Schools. (2007 - 2008). MFAS Student Survey 07-08: School Climate & Satisfaction. Unpublished Survey. Metropolitan Federation of Alternative Schools (Minneapolis).
 25 Students succeed academically Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching Student 16-21, 37-40, 42 high school Metropolitan Federation of Alternative Schools. (2007 - 2008). MFAS Student Survey 07-08: School Climate & Satisfaction. Unpublished Survey. Metropolitan Federation of Alternative Schools (Minneapolis).
 26 Students are healthy Nutritional habits Student 66-79 high school Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). 2009 State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2009 core YRBS). from http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/pdf/questionnaire/2009HighSchool.pdf
 26 Students are healthy Opportunities for physical activity during school Student 83-84 high school Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2009). 2009 State and Local Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2009 core YRBS). from http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/pdf/questionnaire/2009HighSchool.pdf
 27 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel competent Student 1-8 middle and high school Bandura, A. (2006). Guide for constructing self-efficacy scales. In F. Pajares & T. Urdan (Eds.), Adolescence and education (pp. 307-338). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing. p20.
 28 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Opportunities for student leadership Student 8-13 middle and high school Clair, L. S., & Alvarez, L. (2007). Student Survey Middle-High School (in Evaluation Guidebook: Nebraska 21st Century Community Learning Centers). from www.nde.state.ne.us/21stcclc/http://21stcclc.myelearning.org/frames.aspx. p18.
 29 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student 1-10 middle and high school Adams, C. (2008). School Identification Scale (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Voelkl (1997)). Unpublished Survey. p18-19.
 30 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Staff, families, and students feel safe Student 1-6 middle and high school Adams, C. (2008). School Safety Scale (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Consortium on Chicago School Research). Unpublished Survey. p19.
 31 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Student 1-9 middle and high school  Adams, C. (2008). Parent Support for Student Learning (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Consortium on Chicago School Research). Unpublished Survey. p21.
 32 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Student 36, 41-43 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students are healthy Positiveadult relationships Student 7, 33 Senior, High school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students are healthy Positive peer relationship Student 28 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Post-secondary plans Student 33-35, 40-47 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Staff, parents, and students feel safe Student 1-2 Senior High School Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Students feel they belong in school Student 27 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students succeed academically Teacher classroom management Student 16 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Student 4-5, 7, 10-12, 18-19, 31-32, 46 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 32 Students succeed academically Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching Student 4-5, 10-11, 14-15, 18-21, 32 senior, high school Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, & Chicago Public Schools. (2009). Survey of Chicago Public Schools: Senior Student Edition (Senior Student ed., pp. 12): Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, Chicago Public Schools.
 33 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family attendance at school-wide events and parent-teacher conferences Family 4, 6 Stevenson-YMCA. Stevenson-YMCA Community School Family Survey: Parent Satisfaction Survey. Unpublished Survey. Stevenson-YMCA.
 33 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family attendance at self-improvement classes Family 2, 4, 6 Stevenson-YMCA. Stevenson-YMCA Community School Family Survey: Parent Satisfaction Survey. Unpublished Survey. Stevenson-YMCA.
 33 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family experiences with school-wide events, parent-teacher conferences Family 4, 5, 7 Stevenson-YMCA. Stevenson-YMCA Community School Family Survey: Parent Satisfaction Survey. Unpublished Survey. Stevenson-YMCA.
 33 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family experiences with classes Family 4, 5, 7 Stevenson-YMCA. Stevenson-YMCA Community School Family Survey: Parent Satisfaction Survey. Unpublished Survey. Stevenson-YMCA.
 34 Students succeed academically Teachers support students Teacher 1-8 Adams, C. (2008). Community-Based Learning: Voice and Choice Teacher Survey (in Stages of Community School Development Scale). Unpublished Survey. University of Oklahoma.
 35 Families are actively involved in their children's education Opportunities for parent involvement School 5 (part I), 6, 8 (part II) Coalition for Community Schools. Is Your School a Community School? (Draft). Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership,. (unpublished o. Document Number)
 35 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Schools are open to community School 1-10 (part II) Coalition for Community Schools. Is Your School a Community School? (Draft). Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership,. (unpublished o. Document Number)
 36 Students live and learn in stable and supportive environments Staff, parents, and students feel safe Family 3 Chicago Public Schools. (2009). My Voice, My School Parent Survey 2009 (pp. 1-2): Chicago Public Schools.
 36 Schools are engaged with families and community Trust between faculty and families Family 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 Chicago Public Schools. (2009). My Voice, My School Parent Survey 2009 (pp. 1-2): Chicago Public Schools.
 37 Students succeed academically Teachers take positive approach to learning and teaching Teacher 1-9 Adams, C. (2008). Community-Based Learning: Assessment and Feedback Teacher Survey (in Stages of Community School Development Scale). Unpublished Survey. University of Oklahoma. p24-25.
 38 Students are actively involved in learning and their community Schools are open to community Teacher 1-11 Adams, C. (2008). Holistic Programs, Services, and Opportunities: Youth Development/Out of School Time (in Stages of Community School Development Scale). Unpublished Survey. University of Oklahoma. p13-14.
 39 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Parent 1-27 Adams, C. (2008). Parent Responsibility and Collective Parent Responsibility Survey (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (items for survey were adopted from Teacher and Collective Teacher Responsibilities Scales (Goddard & Logerfo, 2008). Unpublished Survey. p8-9.
 40 Families are actively involved in their children's education Families support students' education at home Teacher 1-8 Adams, C. (2008). Parent Responsibility and Collective Parent Responsibility Survey (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (items for survey were adopted from Teacher and Collective Teacher Responsibilities Scales (Goddard & Logerfo, 2008). Unpublished Survey. p19-20.
 41 Schools are engaged with families and community Trust between faculty and families Family 1-18 Adams, C. (2008). Parent Trust of School Scale (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Forsyth, Barnes, and Adams (2002)). Unpublished Survey. p7.
 42 Schools are engaged with families and community Faculty believe they are an effective and competent team Teacher 19, 23-31 Adams, C. (2008). Collective Efficacy Scale: Teacher Efficacy (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Goddard, Hoy, and Woolfolk Hoy (2000)). Unpublished Survey. p12-13.
 42 Schools are engaged with families and community Trust between faculty and families Teacher 2, 6, 8, 10, 11, 14 Adams, C. (2008). Teacher Trust (in Tulsa Area Community Schools Initiative: Evaluation Design) (citing Hoy and Tschannen-Moran (1999), Omnibus T-scale). Unpublished Survey. p12.
 43 Families are actively involved in their children's education Family experiences with school-wide events, parent-teacher conferences Family 1-6 Whalen, S. P. (2006). Comprehensive Community School Program Evaluation Sheet (Adult), Measures and Surveys for Comprehensive Community Schools (Version October 2006) (Vol. 2): University of Illinois at Chicago.
 44 Communities are desirable places to live Employment and employability of residents and families served by the school Family F3-10, section H Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. (2000). Adult Questionaire (Publication., from Rand and UCLA School of Public Health: http://www.lasurvey.rand.org/documentation/questionnaires/samples/adultmain.htm
 44 Communities are desirable places to live Student and families with health insurance Family Section H Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. (2000). Adult Questionaire (Publication., from Rand and UCLA School of Public Health: http://www.lasurvey.rand.org/documentation/questionnaires/samples/adultmain.htm
 45 Communities are desirable places to live Community mobility and stability Family All Mauldon, J., & London, R. (1996). California Time Limits Survey. Unpublished Survey. University of California Berkeley Survey Research Center
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