Coalition for Community Schools - Because Every Child Deserves Every Chance

Newsletter 5.19

Community Schools Online

Community Schools Make it to the White House!
January 15, 2009 Vol. V, No. 19
 

Coalition Update: Report to the Field
Community Schools Advocate Makes it to The White House!
Community Engagement Saves a School
Could It Be True – Free Health Care?
Netter Center for Community Partnerships Releases Inaugural Annual Report for 2007-08
Community Schools’ leader named 1 of 50 “Power People” in Cincinnati!
Ushering in the New Year with a New Website!
CALL TO ACTION - The Community Agenda for America’s Public Schools
Call for Research


In the News
Geoffrey Canada Fights for Community Schools
Homeless Students are Costing School Districts
Where Will the Money Come From?
Low Performing Schools are Failing Their Parents
33% of Black and Hispanic Kids Are Dropping Out
Apples Instead of French Fries?
NCLB Trips Up Solid Schools


Research, Publications, and Tools
Strengthening Schools by Strengthening Families
What is a Comprehensive Approach to Student Supports?
Community Supports Inadequate for Getting into College
A Smart System in London
By Youth – for Youth: The Declaration of Inter-Dependence
Ten Skills Students Will Need for 2020
Can Communities and Schools Together Address Mental Health?


Events, Funding and Job Opportunities
New Community Organizing and Family Issues Website!
Coalition Allies and Partners Grant Tracking Systems

Coalition Update: Report to the Field

A Community School Advocate Makes it to The White House!
Click here to view Arne Duncan, CEO of the Chicago Public Schools, at his Senate confirmation hearing. Mr. Duncan as the new Secretary of Education signals a new era for community schools. For the first time the Department of Education will be led by someone who has a deep understanding of the importance of the connection between schools and their communities and has demonstrated his commitment by creating 150 community schools. Read more about Arne Duncan and the Chicago Public Schools at the Coalition’s website….

Community Engagement Saves a School
A Cincinnati public school was close to being closed, due to decreasing enrollment and poor academic outcomes – and turned into an industrial park. Through community engagement the Oyler Community Learning Center will now have a full-time co-located Boys and Girls Club, a health center, full time mental health services including a child psychiatrist from Children's Hospital, hundreds of volunteers, a co-located recreation center program for adults that goes until 11 at night as well as year round programming.

Could It Be True - Free Health Care?
Families that cannot afford health care, come to Clinic with a Heart, a free urgent care health clinic that’s moved into two southwest Lincoln neighborhood schools: McPhee and Saratoga. The clinic’s new school locations are part of the Lincoln Community Learning Centers. The goal of moving the clinics into the schools is to eliminate illness as a barrier to education. Read more…

kidsThe Netter Center for Community Partnerships Releases Inaugural Annual Report for 2007-08
The Center’s, inaugural Annual Report highlights university-assisted community schools as an effective approach for local and national education reform.  The Netter Center hopes that the report provides a useful discussion of the critical role higher education institutions can play in revitalizing our schools and communities. To download a pdf of the report, click here.

Community Schools’ leader named 1 of 50 “Power People” in Cincinnati!
Darlene Kamine, a consultant for Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS), was recently recognized as one of the top 50 most powerful people in education in Cincinnati. Among her most notable achievements is working with CPS to build community learning centers. Darlene works tirelessly to bring together all of the essential stakeholders: community members, parents, businesses, school administrators, and nonprofits. Congratulations Darlene and thanks for all of your hard work and dedication to community schools!

Ushering in the New Year with a new Website!
Click here to read a summary of the survey that was sent out in December 2008, in an effort to re-design the Coalition’s website. If you weren’t able to participate in the survey, feel free to email Shital C. Shah, Research Associate with your comments about the website: shahs@iel.org.

CALL TO ACTION - The Community Agenda for America’s Public Schools
Thanks to your hard work, The Community Agenda (TCA) continues to get endorsers. We now have over 170 endorsements! We encourage you to keep sharing The Community Agenda with your partners and networks and getting them to endorse . If you would like copies of The Community Agenda, contact Shital C. Shah at shahs@iel.org. You can also send her stories about how you are using The Community Agenda in your communities and with your policymakers!

Call for Research
This summer we asked you for your research on community schools.  As we work to complete the community schools research synthesis we need for you to send any NEW reports that you may have completed since summer 2008 to Reuben Jacobson at jacobsonr@iel.org.

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In the News

Geoffrey Canada Fights for Community Schools
View Canada's, remarks from a panel discussion hosted by the Center for American Progress. Canada state that he will "fight for community schools for as long as it takes." He argues that schools need to undertake instructional reform, in addition to students receiving support services. It is a "both/and" situation. Read more about The Harlem Children’s Zone

Homeless Students are Costing School Districts
As more jobs are lost and foreclosures are increasing, the numbers of homeless families are increasing. This in turn is creating homeless students. Three hundred and thirty school districts across the country report having more homeless students this year than in the last school year. This influx is costing school districts - forcing them to look for other sources of funding and resources. This is where community partnerships become essential. Through the coordination of services with local partners, schools will be able to meet the needs of their homeless students and families.

Where Will the Money Come From?
Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) touts community schools as a smart funding strategy to use during our financial crisis. The community schools approach enables CPS to use outside funding to offer support services. Their external partnerships have been critical for the district’s sustainability. The lessons that CPS and its schools have learned by identifying and sustaining partnerships can be applied to many other urban districts that are struggling to gain extra support in tough economic times.  Read more…

Low Performing Schools are Failing Their Parents
Click here to read a Civic Enterprises study revealing that parents whose children attend high-performing schools said their schools do a far better job reaching out to them than did parents of children in low-performing schools. Parents note the importance of their involvement in their teenagers’ high school educations, but parents from low-performing schools say their schools do little to facilitate this. The report confirms this assertion by assigning primary responsibility for poor parent engagement to the schools. Read more… 

33% of Black and Hispanic Kids Are Dropping Out
A new Federal rule will require schools and states to reduce dropouts. They will now have to track and lift the graduation rates for all students, including minorities and students with disabilities, under regulations announced by Education Secretary Margaret Spellings. The new rules are an attempt to extend the No Child Left Behind education law to the high school grades, and they come in the waning days of the Bush administration, which made the law a signature domestic achievement. Read more… 

Apples Instead of French Fries?
The federal Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Snack Program provides funds to give students the foods intended to combat obesity, malnutrition and their attendant ills – many of which prevent learning. The 2008 federal farm bill expanded the program to all 50 states, providing nearly $49 million for this year and growing to $150 million in 2011-12. To be eligible, at least half of the students in a school must qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. The money goes to the states, which distribute it to schools or districts. Read more…

NCLB Trips Up Solid Schools
Until now, Prairie Elementary School, in a working class California neighborhood, had not missed a testing target since the federal NCLB law took effect in 2002. Now for the first time, Prairie, and hundreds of other California schools, fell short, a failure that results in probation and, unless reversed, federal sanctions within a year. In the past it has moved each of its student groups — Hispanics, blacks, Asians, whites, American Indians, Filipinos, Pacific Islanders, English learners, the disabled — toward higher proficiency. But this year, California schools were required to increase the students proficient in every group by 11 percentage points. Read more…

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Research, Publications and Tools

Strengthening Schools by Strengthening Families
This report, by the Center for New York City Affairs, discovered that more than 90,000 children, grades k-5 (20% of New York City's enrollment) has missed at least 1 month of school.  The one-year snapshot of New York City public schools discusses strategies to reverse rates of early chronic absence in the early grades as well as strategies on how to improve supports for children and families.  One of the main recommendations is to identify 50-100 schools with high rates of chronic absenteeism in high-poverty districts, and implement the community schools model. Read more…

What is a Comprehensive Approach to Student Supports?
Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor, from the School Mental Health Project at UCLA, have produced a brief conveying what does and doesn't constitute a comprehensive support system. They argue that it requires more than just developing a system of supports -- there needs to be a proposal to enhance coordination of fragmented efforts. Click here to read more…  

Community Supports Inadequate for Getting into College
In 2007, trained by the College Ambassador’s action research project nine young Black men analyzed the supports available to college-bound students in their North Philadelphia neighborhoods and schools. They concluded that the opportunities and supports for postsecondary education in their communities and schools are inadequate. In support of their work, the Annenberg Institute published Building College Pathways Takes a Village: Findings from the North Philadelphia College Ambassadors Project, describing the motivation for the project, how the Ambassadors were recruited and trained, and details of their findings and recommendations.  

A Smart System in London
There is a growing recognition that improving outcomes for children and youth will require schools to form links with community agencies and organizations to address a broad range of in-school and out-of-school factors that affect learning and development. The Annenberg Institute for School Reform calls this idea a “smart education system.” In England, this idea has become a national policy. Voices in Urban Education examines the policy in practice by looking in depth at one local British authority that has been remarkably successful across a range of health, social, educational, and economic indicators. Read more…

 By Youth for Youth: The Declaration of Inter-Dependence
This Declaration of Inter-Dependence was first written in 1999, by the YouthBuild National Young Leaders Council and the YouthBuild National Alumni Council with the goal of changing the conditions of their communities to ensure that future generations have a direct and less painful path to success. The Declaration argues that every child and youth should have the opportunity to be part of a school community in which people care about each other and learn positive values, leadership and life skills, academic and vocational skills, and where young people’s input is respected. Read more…

Ten Skills Students Will Need for 2020
In an effort to remain competitive in the global economy and figure out what their students needed to succeed, the Ohio Department of Education’s Subcommittee for Education in the New Global Economy conducted a 1.5 year study. They captured the list of the Top 10 most important skills, knowledge, and behaviors that students will need to succeed in the global economy and ways to strengthen the education system to better meet students' needs. Click here to learn about these skills.

Can Communities and Schools Together Address Mental Health?
Proposition 63 (now known as the Mental Health Services Act) was passed in 2004 in California. It created at once an opportunity and great challenges for enhancing the state's mental health system and improving how communities and schools address long-standing problems. In this paper, Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor, from the School Mental Health Project at UCLA, provide guidance about using schools as the venue for California’s mental health systems. Read more…

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Events, Funding, and Job Opportunities

New Community Organizing and Family Issues Website!
Community Organizing and Family Issues (COFI), a Chicago-based nonprofit, has a new website! COFI’s mission is to strengthen the power and voice of low-income and working families at all levels of civic life.  They work to build the power and voice of low–income and working families at all levels of civic life. Through their development and organizing process, parents develop skills, confidence, and the organized power to win improvements in schools, communities, and public policies.

Coalition Allies and Partners Grant Tracking Systems
For up-to-date funding opportunities, please bookmark our partners’ websites and/or sign up for their newsletters:

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